Writing People off with a Meme

Memes have become very popular in recent years, especially on social media. A catchy picture and a short remark can really make your point. I have posted them myself.

But there is a danger.

RejectI have noticed an increasing trend of Christians posting memes attacking other Christians. A picture of the individual and a statement or quote without context and people are ready to write the person off as a heretic.

I am not saying that we shouldn’t be concerned about false theology in the church. The Bible tells us to be watchful.

My concern is that people like and share such memes without a thought of checking the truth of the claim. More than once I have done the research and have found that the individual did not believe what the claims were saying. It is almost as if people see memes as having some special authority.

Let me share a very important truth:

NOT EVERYTHING ON THE INTERNET IS TRUE.

This is especially important for us to remember when it comes to how Christians treat other Christians.

“Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you? If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy him. For God’s temple is holy, and you are that temple.” (1 Corinthians 3:16–17 ESV)

I don’t know how many times I have heard these verses quoted as proof that God does not want us to smoke (and you shouldn’t smoke, but for other reasons). The “you” here is plural and in the context, the destruction of the temple is the damage done through creating unhealthy division. Apparently God doesn’t like that.

I recently received a message from a person checking about my theology. This person was debating another person who had been citing an article I wrote to support a heretical position.

The person I talked to did the right thing. He did not create a meme with an embarrassing picture of me and an accusation that I was the arch-heretic. He contacted me directly and I was able to provide context and clarification to demonstrate that I indeed held the orthodox position.

I understand that when a well designed meme comes around claiming something about a Christian you may have suspicions about, it is easy to like and share it.

But do some research to find out if such claims are even true. Memes can lie you know. And even if it is true, consider what positive outcome, if any, will come by sharing it.

 

Liked it? Take a second to support Stephen Bedard on Patreon!
Share

One thought on “Writing People off with a Meme”

  1. Stephen, excellent, very challenging and food for thought. At first when I read the title I thought it was going to be about non-Christian memes, and then I thought this doesn’t apply to me. But then a realisation came that I need to run my facebook activity through a thought process like this, in case I might be doing it. Thanks for the prompt.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.