Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that you should check out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts for you to check out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts for you to check out.

 

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.

 


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts you should check out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that you should check out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that you should go check out.


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God’s Crime Scene for Kids – Review

Two of the most important hats that I wear are those of a pastor interested in apologetics and of a father of young children. As each year passes, I’m becoming more and more convinced of the overlap between the two. That’s why I’m thankful for J. Warner and Susie Wallace’s God’s Crime Scene for Kids.

I have read the adult version of this and Wallace’s other books and have appreciated how he is able to translate complex topics into language that normal people can understand. Having not read any of his children’s books before, I was curious how he would do it with this book.

I was very pleased with the result. Two of my children love to be read to and so I have a sense of what style they connect with. God’s Crime Scene for Kids very much fits with that style.

The book is not a compilation of apologetic assertions but rather is an engaging story of a mystery that pulls in the reader. As they seek to solve this real mystery, Warner makes the connections between it and the evidence for God. He does it in a very natural way that does not seem forced.

I have read some pretty cheesy Christian children’s books but this is not one of them. Even as an adult, I was pulled into the story and wanted to know how it would end.

I intend to take my children through God’s Crime Scene for Kids. I think they will both find it interesting and be strengthened in their faith.

 

 

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts for you to check out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that are worth checking out.


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Forensic Faith – Review

Forensic FaithWhen I was offered an advance review copy of Forensic Faith by J. Warner Wallace, I didn’t have to think twice about my decision. I have read his first two books: Cold-Case Christianity and God’s Crime Scene and loved them. I expected the same level of quality for Forensic Faith.

I was not disappointed.

Forensic Faith contains the same strengths of the first two books but without rehashing the same material. Forensic Faith has specific goal and is not just a repackaging of the earlier books.

Forensic Faith is more of an apologetic for apologetics (or perhaps as Warner would say, a case being made for case-making). Warner has noticed, has have many in the apologetics community, that there is opposition to apologetics even within the church. Whether it is an assumption that apologetics is ineffective or a fear that apologetics requires too much intelligence, there is a prejudice against apologetics.

Warner presents a strong case for apologetics with his signature style of using illustrations from his career as a homicide detective.This is really one of Warner’s strengths. I’m convinced that even people who don’t like apologetics will enjoy his books because of the insights he provides from his police career. I’m able to read his books much faster than other books on similar topics because of Warner’s engaging style.

As Warner has preached, we don’t need more million dollar apologists, we need a million one dollar apologists. If we could mobilize the people in our churches to be able to provide the basic case for Christianity, we could have a huge impact on our culture. Forensic Faith is a valuable resource for making this happen. Consider using this book as a study in your church or small group.

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that you might find interesting.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts for you to take a look at.

 

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that you should check out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts for you to check out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts I came across this week. Go and check them out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related blog posts I came across this week.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that you should go and check out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across. You might find them helpful.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that you might find helpful.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts I came across this week. I hope you find them helpful.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related blog posts I came across this week. Enjoy.


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that you might want to check out.

Some Additional Resources:


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related blog posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.

Additional Resources:


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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Make sure to go and check them out.

Recommended Book:

Apologetics Study Bible (USA) (Canada)

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts I discovered this week. Go check them out and feed your mind.

Recommended Book:

God’s Crime Scene: A Cold-Case Detective Examines the Evidence for a Divinely Created Universe by J. Warner Wallace (USA) (Canada)

Recommended Video:

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across. Go and check them out.

Recommended Book:

The Historical Jesus: Five Views edited by James K. Beilby and Paul R. Eddy (USA) (Canada)

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. Go and check them out.

Recommended Book:

How to Talk to a Skeptic: An Easy-to-Follow Guide for Natural Conversations and Effective Apologetics by Donald J. Johnson (USA) (Canada)

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week. You should check them out.

Recommended Book:

Relativism: Feet Firmly Planted in Mid-Air by Francis Beckwith and Greg Koukl (USA) (Canada)

 

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some apologetics-related posts I came across this week. You should check them out.

Recommended Book:

Handbook of Christian Apologetics edited by Peter Kreeft and Ronald Tacelli (USA) (Canada)

 

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Apologetics roundupHere are some apologetics-related posts that I came across this week.

From My Archives:

10 Things That Apologists Should Know Something About

Recommended Book:

The Resurrection of the Son of God by N.T. Wright (USA) (Canada)

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Summer Reading Suggestions

Hopefully you will be getting some vacation time this summer, where you can relax and enjoy a good book. I sometimes get teased that my relaxing reading is no different from my work reading. That does not bother me one bit!

I asked some people about their summer reading plans and apparently I’m not unique in my tastes. Take a look at what they are reading and perhaps you will find some ideas for your own reading list.

What about you? What will you be reading this summer?

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

Here are some interesting apologetics-related blog posts that I discovered this week. Have a look and expand your knowledge.

From My Archives:

Top Ten Problems With the Jesus Myth Theory

Recommended Book:

Five Views on Apologetics (USA) (Canada)

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

There is a tremendous amount of good quality apologetics content available. Here is some of what I have found this week. Make sure to check out these posts.

From My Archives:

10 Reasons Why There Really Was a Historical Jesus

Recommended Book:

The Gospel in the Marketplace of Ideas by Paul Copan and Kenneth Litwak (USA) (Canada)

 

 

 

 

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Top Ten Books in Apologetics

ApologeticsI often hear people asking about recommendations for books in the area of apologetics. There are always good and new books coming out. One place where you can look for these is the book reviews page at Hope’s Reason: A Journal of Apologetics.

Another way to find what is good is to look at the Amazon best sellers in the apologetics category. What I find interesting about this is that many of the older books, especially by C.S. Lewis, are at the top of the list.

Here are the top ten apologetics books as of the time of this post. Please note that I am an Amazon affiliate and you can support my ministry by purchasing books through these links.

  1. Mere Christianity by C.S Lewis
  2. The Reason for God by Tim Keller
  3. The Case for Christ by Lee Strobel
  4. The Complete C.S. Lewis Signature Classics by C.S. Lewis
  5. Finding Truth by Nancy Pearcey
  6. The Knowledge of the Holy by A.W. Tozer
  7. Cold-Case Christianity by J. Warner Wallace
  8. More Than a Carpenter by Josh McDowell
  9. I Don’t Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist by Norman Geisler and Frank Turek
  10. The Weight of Glory by C.S. Lewis
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Top Ten Books I Read in 2015

Top Ten BooksI love reading books and I’m thankful that I have been blessed with a great library. Here are the top ten books that I read in 2015. I hope you get a sense of the diversity of books that I try to read. They are in no particular order.

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5 Books I Read Over the Summer

Summer is a chance for me to catch up on some of my reading. I have less classes to teach and my chaplaincy work is lighter. Now that summer is over, it is time for me to look back on what I read. I actually read more than these five, but these are the ones that my readers might be most interested in. You can find a fuller list here.

  • Shifting Stats by Patricia Paddey and Karen Stiller (USA) (Canada)
  • Nonviolent Action by Ronald Sider (USA) (Canada)
  • The Historical Jesus: Five Views edited by James K. Beilby and Paul Rhodes Eddy (USA) (Canada)
  • Boundaries by Henry Cloud and John Townsend (USA) (Canada)
  • God’s Crime Scene by J. Warner Wallace (USA) (Canada)

You will notice that there is a wide variety among the books I read. If you take into account the non-religious books I read, it is even wider. I believe it is important for people to read outside their immediate interests. I recommend each of the books listed above.

Books

 

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God’s Crime Scene

A few years ago, I was given a review copy of a book by a new apologist named J.Warner Wallace. I loved his Cold-Case Christianity and so I was happy when I heard he had new book coming out.

God's Crime SceneWallace’s God’s Crime Scene is written very much in the same style as his earlier book and they can be considered companion volumes. What makes Wallace’s books unique is that he draws heavily on his experience as a cold-case detective. Each chapter begins with a story from Wallace’s police past and then transitions into a topic related to the existence of God.

Most of this book deals with issues surrounding intelligent design, whether on the cosmological or biological level. Wallace wisely avoids controversies over young earth creation, old earth creation or theistic evolution. In fact Wallace’s arguments are based more on science and philosophy than on biblical texts. Wallace stays close to his focus, which is that the nature of the evidence points to a suspect “outside the room,” that is a being outside of creation.

Wallace also touches on issues such as the problem of evil and other related topics. He uses all of these to build a cumulative case that it looks like an Intelligent Designer is responsible for all that we see.

Not only is this book full of good information, it is also very well written. Wallace knows how to keep the reader’s interest. I read the book in two sittings, which is very unusual for me.

Anyone would enjoy this book but I would especially recommend the book to an interested seeker or a new Christian looking to strengthen their faith. It could also be used effectively for a small group study.

I highly recommend that you purchase God’s Crime Scene, a resource worthy of being in any library.

You can get this book from Amazon (USA) (Canada).

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

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Apologetics Roundup (10/05-10/11)

Heresy and Creeds – Darren Rodrigues

How Not to Argue Against Relativism – Thomas Rauchenstein

Getting the Most Out of Apologetics Conferences – Patrick Collins

Do We Really Need to Teach Our Kids Apologetics When God is in Control Anyway? – Natasha Crain

How Evidence Helps Doubters Become Devotees – J. Warner Wallace

Recommended Resources:

 

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Apologetics Roundup (9/28-10/04)

The Benefits of Community in Apologetics – Zak Schmoll

2 Reasons Why Beliefs are (Almost) Involuntary – Thomas Rauchenstein

Why Understanding the Imago Dei is More Crucial than Ever – Lenny Esposito

You Are What You Think! – Eric Chabot

Do Denominational Disagreements Falsify Christianity? – J. Warner Wallace

Recommended Resource:

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Apologetics Roundup (9/21-9/27)

Canada and Christianity: Where Are We? – Justin Wishart

Is Atheism the Default Position? – Patrick Collins

Word of Advice to Atheists – Stop Defining Atheism as a Lack of Belief – Tyler Vela

Resources to Help You Defend the Historicity of Jesus – J. Warner Wallace

How Do We Teach Youth Apologetics? – Brett Kunkle

Recommended Resource:

 

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Apologetics Roundup (9/14-9/20)

Mother Theresa is NOT Good… Without God – Chris Price

Leaders – How well are you getting people grounded in the faith? – Mark McIntyre

4 Components of the Soul-Making Theodicy – Thomas Rauchenstein

Values so Shockingly Consistent They Make the News – Lenny Esposito

Three Ways Large Churches Can Effectively Reach the Lost – J. Warner Wallace

Recommended Resource:

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Apologetics Roundup (9/07-9/13)

Did the God of the Old Testament Command Genocide Part One – Thomas Rauchenstein

Why Size Doesn’t Matter – Chris Price

Atheism And Evil In The Name Of God – Mikel Del Rosario

What Really Happened at Nicea – Kevin Short

22 Important Questions for the Buddhistic Worldview – J. Warner Wallace

Recommended Resource:

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

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Apologetics Roundup (8/24-8/30)

A Pastor Can Be Trained to Defend the Faith Even Without Formal Training – Matt Rawlings

A Look at Pauline Apologetics: What Can Apologists Learn From Paul? – Eric Chabot

The Blind Monks and the Elephant: a Christian Interpretation – Justin Wishart

4 Ways in Which Jesus Saw Himself as Divine – Thomas Rauchenstein

The Rich, Contradictory History of Mormon Polygamy – J. Warner Wallace

Recommended Reading:

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Midweek Apologetics Roundup

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Cold-Case Christianity Free on Kindle

One of the best books on apologetics that I have read is J. Warner Wallace’s Cold-Case Christianity. It is unique in that it looks at the truth of Christianity from the perspective of a cold-case detective. Warner is an engaging writer and I found it hard to put down. This book is both appropriate for Christians seeking to learn more and for seekers who are considering Christianity. It is a book you should have in your library.

And now you have no excuse. Just for August 11-12, 2014, Cold-Case Christianity is available for free on Kindle. Yes I said free. Download one for you and make sure your friends get one too.

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Apologetics Roundup (7/03 -7/10)

What Criminal Trials Teach Us About Objective Moral Truth – J. Warner Wallace

Would Jesus Say “I’m spiritual, but not religious?” – Eric Chabot

The Google Generation – Nick Peters

What an Apologist’s Job is NOT– Melissa Cain Travis

Apologists Stop Wasting Your Time – Jacob Allee

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Apologetics Roundup 06/29 – 07/05

Rights and Their Freedoms Come From God Alone – Lenny Esposito

Parents: Train Your Young Christians by Finding the Right Mentor – J. Warner Wallace

Where Do You Experience Doubts with Your Faith? – Greg Koukl

Conversations with Stephen Meyer: Surprised by Praise – Stephen Meyer

Apologetics of Jesus – Eric Chabot

Recommended Reading: The Original Jesus by N.T. Wright

 

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Apologetics Roundup 06/22 – 06/28

Does 1 Corinthians 2:4 Mean Christians are Wrong to use Apologetics in their Evangelism? – Daniel Rodger

Three Simple Strategies to Help You Become A Better Christian Case Maker – J. Warner Wallace

Of Pageants and Propaganda – Lenny Esposito

Should All Churches Be “Mere”ly “Christian”? – J.W. Wartick

What Can We Know About Jesus? – Eric Chabot

Recommended Reading: Cold-Case Christianity by J. Warner Wallace

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Apologetics Roundup 6/15 – 6/21

Why is There Evil and Suffering? – Lynette Olfert

How to Be the Christian Case Maker You Have Always Wanted to Be – J. Warner Wallace

Who Wrote the Gospels? – Ben Witherington III

How Not to Talk to a Skeptic – Don Johnson

3 Good Reasons to Question What You Believe – Luke Nix

Recommended Book: Resurrection of Jesus by Michael Licona

 

 

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Cold-Case Christianity

A number of years ago, Lee Strobel’s Case for Christ made a huge impact on the Christian community and on skeptics.  Why?  It was not because it was answering the hard questions for the first time.  There were many other books available with more detailed and complex answers to the questions that are out there.  But Lee Strobel was able to take the information already available and package it in an engaging format based on his experience as a journalist.

Since that time, there have been many excellent apologetics books, especially on the academic side.  But finally there is another book that is effective in engaging the imagination and drawing the reader in beyond just good information.

J. Warner Wallace’s first book, Cold-Case Christianity, is the apologetics book that we have been waiting for.  Wallace has many years of experience as a cold-case detective.  It was through the skills that he attained in his profession that he came to believe in the truth of Christianity.  Coming from a place of deep skepticism, Wallace needed evidence that was compelling.  In this book, Wallace shares this evidence.

Cold-Case Christianity is filled with the apologetic resources that you would expect.  Wallace presents solid reasons for believing in the truth of Christianity.  He demonstrates that the Gospels are good historical documents that need to be taken seriously.  Wallace is not afraid to confront critics and he interacts effectively with their criticisms.  The reader of this book will be equipped with good information that can be used in responding to skeptical friends.

However, the real value of this book is that Wallace goes beyond teaching us facts, he teaches us how to think.  Wallace takes us into the world of the cold-case detective.  He shares stories from cases that he has worked on, explaining what worked and what did not.  These stories are very interesting and they drew me right into the book.  But more than entertaining stories, Wallace’s experience helps us to know how to deal with evidence and interpret information.  The skills he imparts are helpful for working through biblical data but also equips us how to interact with any claims that we come across.  Each chapter concludes with a specific tool for our “call out bag,” that set of skills that we always need with us to sift through the mix of truth and falsehood that we often encounter.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book.  After having read many apologetics books, it can be a chore to read another book with the same old presentation.  But this book puts the information together in such a fresh and interesting way, it was a pleasure to read.  I would recommend this book to three groups of people.  This book is good for experienced apologists, who need to be reminded of the real life application of apologetics.  This book is good for Christians who are just getting started in apologetics and who need a resource that is clear and accessible.  However, the group that might benefit the most from this book are the interested skeptics.  Wallace makes the book so interesting that the reader will not feel like they are plodding through a theology book.  The detective stories will hold the attention, while not compromising on the biblical arguments for the truth of Christianity.  I highly recommend this book for all three of these groups.

FNL

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Apologetics Canada Conference 2013

I am very much interested in the apologetics activity that is taking place in Canada and so I am pleased to share with you information about the Apologetics Canada Conference that is taking place March 1-2, 2013 in Abbotsford BC.  You can find the information here.  This conference will include such great speakers as William Lane Craig, Andy Bannister, John Patrick, J. Warner Wallace and Andy Steiger, plus breakout sessions with numerous other speakers.  Make sure to check it out.

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